Distinct Effects of Royal Jelly on Human Endothelial Cells Under High Glucose Condition.

Distinct Effects of Royal Jelly on Human Endothelial Cells Under High Glucose Condition.

April 03, 2019 0 Comments

To assess different effects of royal Jelly in protecting the human endothelial cells from high glucose level, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to various concentrations of royal jelly, from 0.625 to 10 mg/mL, at the presence of 5 and 30 mM glucose contents over a course of 72 h. In addition to cell viability assessment by conventional MTT assay, we also analyzed the feature of stemness by expression of Sox-2 and CD133 factors. Moreover, fatty acid profile, the expression of autophagy-related factor, namely microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 and activity of metalloproteinase 2 and 9 and were investigated. Royal jelly supplementation at the concentrations lower than 2.5 mg/mL did not influence the survival rate of cells and partially blunted the cytotoxic effects of 30 mM glucose. The expression of CD133 and Sox-2 factors were increased by royal jelly alone. Interestingly, an up-regulated expression of Sox-2 (58.8± 4%) coincided with a reduction in the levels of CD133 (15.1 ± 8.3%) in the combined treatment. We notified that the contents of palmitate and trans-palmitate as well as linoleate decreased by 30 mM glucose content while cis-palmitate levels increased when RJ returned them to near-normal levels (<0.05). The expression of autophagy marker was prominently induced in the presence of royal jelly in both conditions (<0.05). The glucose-induced activity of metalloproteinases was also reduced. Royal jelly is able to attenuate the abnormal status of 30 mM glucose condition in endothelial cells by different mechanisms.



Also in Industry News

Transcriptomic Sequencing of Airway Epithelial Cell NCI-H292 Induced by Synthetic Cationic Polypeptides
Transcriptomic Sequencing of Airway Epithelial Cell NCI-H292 Induced by Synthetic Cationic Polypeptides

April 18, 2019 0 Comments

Copyright © 2019 Ya-Ni Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Eosinophil asthma is characterized by the infiltration of eosinophils to the bronchial epithelium. The toxic cationic protein released by eosinophils, mainly major basic protein (MBP), is one of the most important causative factors of epithelium dama...

Read More

Cancer cells resist mechanical destruction in the circulation via RhoA-myosin II axis

April 09, 2019 0 Comments

During metastasis cancer cells are exposed to potentially destructive hemodynamic forces including fluid shear stress (FSS) while en route to distant sites. However, prior work indicates that cancer cells are more resistant to brief pulses of high-level fluid shear stress (FSS) in vitro relative to non-transformed epithelial cells. Herein we identify a mechanism of FSS resistance in cancer cells, and extend these findings to mouse models of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). We show that cancer cel...

Read More

The Role of Fibrosis and Liver-Associated Fibroblasts in the Pathogenesis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma
The Role of Fibrosis and Liver-Associated Fibroblasts in the Pathogenesis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

April 09, 2019 0 Comments

IJMS | Free Full-Text | The Role of Fibrosis and Liver-Associated Fibroblasts in the Pathogenesis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Next Article in Journal New Innovations in Wound Healing and Repair Previous Article in Journal Crude α-Mangostin Suppresses the Development of Atherosclerotic Lesions in Apoe-Deficient Mice by a Possible M2 Macrophage-Mediated Mechanism Previous Article in Special Is...

Read More